Midigator values transparency. We want you to know how your data is being handled and the actions made on your behalf. The Chargeback Manager page provides action insight for the various stages of a chargeback response.

The Chargeback Manager page consists of four tabs, each monitoring a different phase of the representment process.

  • Match Order: When chargeback are first received by Midigator, they are listed in the Match Order table until they can be paired with the original transaction. Midigator’s automation runs on a service interval, so any unmatched cases that have accumulated will be picked up and processed by the technology.
  • Process CB: Once a chargeback has been matched to its original transaction, the case will be moved to the Process CB table. These cases are being processed by Midigator to determine if they should or shouldn’t be fought.
  • Pending CB: This report lists all the chargeback responses that have been submitted during the selected time period. All cases will remain visible on this report until a verdict has been issued and they are moved to the Completed CB report.
  • Completed CB: Once a case’s outcome has been determined, the chargeback will be moved to the Completed CB report. This report lists all the chargebacks completed during the selected time period. The possible outcomes include Won, Lost, and Did Not Fight.
    Various features allow you to analyze this report’s data in greater detail and learn more about your chargebacks

Customize Columns

Midigator allows you to customize your reports so you can easily see the information that’s most important to you. One way you can do this is by hiding or viewing different columns of data.

  • Click the Show / Hide Columns menu above the report.
  • Select the columns of data you want to view or hide from the default display.

Once you’ve determined which columns of data you’d like displayed in your default view, you can sort the data.

  • Click the arrows in any column to sort the data in ascending or descending order.

Search for Specific Data

The Chargeback Manager report has a search feature. Enter any value you want to find. You can search your entire report or specifically focus on one characteristic—like a credit card number or reason code.

Column Title Definitions

The following is an explanation of the column titles used on the four different tabs in the Chargeback Manager report.

  • Amount: The dollar amount of the chargeback
  • Case Number: The identification number generated by the cardholder’s bank
  • CC Number: Available digits of the card number associated with the chargeback
  • Chargeback Case ID: An identification number assigned by Midigator for internal management purposes
  • Date Received: The date Midigator received the chargeback
  • MID: The merchant identification number, a unique identifier for the merchant account that was used to process the original transaction
  • Name: Full customer name
  • Order ID: A unique identification number assigned to the transaction by your CRM or order management system
  • Portal Transaction Date: The transaction date as recorded by the payment processing portal (when an order is later matched to a chargeback, the system will use the transaction date provided by the CRM or order management system)
  • Processed: Available information explaining the action taken for a given case
  • Reason Code: Numerical code assigned by the cardholder’s bank to explain why the transaction was disputed
  • Reason Description: The reason code description
  • Result: The outcome of the chargeback response
  • Shipping Tracking ID: Tracking number for the shipment used to deliver the product
  • Status: The case’s most current status
  • Transaction Date: Transaction date as reported in the original order

How do I find out why a chargeback was marked as Did Not Fight?

Follow these steps to determine why a chargeback wasn’t fought:

  • Visit the Chargeback Manager page
  • Click on the Completed CB report
  • Hover over the Did Not Fight text in the Results column
  • A popup box will appear that explains why the chargeback wasn’t fought

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